Friday, October 28, 2005

John Dewey


(October 1859 – June 1952)

The idea we found most interesting was that of “learning by doing” (or by ‘direct living’): learning Mathematics by using proportions in cooking breakfast, and Chemistry by investigating the natural processes involved; learning History by experiencing how people lived. It was important for him that the students participate in concrete activities with practical relevance to their lives, thus keeping them interested and motivated. What is experienced firsthand is more likely to be remembered and internalized. Although this method is interesting and useful for some learners, its limitations are obvious: the level of the knowledge cannot go far beyond basic operations or concepts outside of what is experienced.

Contributed by Cynthia Randerath and Maria Perez Armendariz - 1st year students

7 comments:

Yohi said...
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blacky said...
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Andy said...

"I have never seen any of the ideas advocated by John Dewey applied at school, as I was taught in a traditional way. At the time when I attended a state school, the system was authoritarian ,students were not able to express their ideas and they were also discriminated when registering and even inside school if they didn’t belong to a wealthy family. The students who were praised where those whose parents always came to school and gave presents to teachers or the headmistress. It may seem unbelievable but it is true.



As a teacher-to-be, I would especially like to apply one of Dewey's concepts in my practice: diversity - meaning that each individual should be recognised for his or her own abilities, interests,ideas,needs and cultural identity. I would like to teach small groups as communities in which students are engaged in creative problem-solving and where each member has roles, tasks to perform. I also agree with his idea of experiential education, as we can see in the aims The Children School of Oak Park ".



SUGGESTION: hyperlink The Children School of Oak Park to a site where readers can read about this.

Pat Maceda said...

I am also amazed when I come to think that the ideas we today still consider kind of avant-garde are not so. As regards this topic, you can also read about Froebel, and in Argentina, Manuel Belgrano and Domingo F. Sarmiento. These thinkers also shared these ideas.

Pame said...

I'm agree with Gladys idea. Sometimes I used to think what is this subject useful for... I tried to think the application of what I was teaching (specially in primary school) and sometimes when I find the reason, the application it encourage me to keep learning (especially at maths...Grrr). And when I cannot find the application, I just know that it would be useful for something some day...

Shrarh said...

Hi,Cynthia & Maria
It is good idea but we cann't find it these days here (In Sudan)they work with the classic method.
I hope that it will be change soon
Muhanned From Sudan

Joako Ierfino said...

I think his "Laboratory School" was very important because, as you well said, students learned about Maths and History and other subjects through craft activities and practical experiences. I think it is a brilliant way for students to learn, especially young students.